Pyongyang citizens gather in front of a big screen at Pyongyang Railway Station in Pyongyang, capital of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, to watch a news report on the hydrogen bomb test on Jan. 6, 2016/Courtesy of MCTcampus

Pyongyang citizens gather in front of a big screen at Pyongyang Railway Station in Pyongyang, capital of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, to watch a news report on the hydrogen bomb test on Jan. 6, 2016/Courtesy of MCTcampus

By Brendan Daly, News Editor

North Korea has claimed to have successfully detonated a Hydrogen bomb in one of its nuclear testing sites near Pyongyang, the nation’s capital. The January 6 nuclear test would be the fourth of its kind enacted by North Korea since 2006. The hydrogen bomb that was tested is much more powerful than the previous three plutonium bombs that have been tested by the North Korean military. If this claim is proven to be true, it will be a serious advancement in the nation’s military advancements in nuclear technology. Just for comparison, the supposed hydrogen bomb that was detonated produced seismic activity over a hundred times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Nagasaki in 1945.

The explosion was set underground to reduce to nuclear fallout of the weapon. But because of that, it caused a seismic event registering on the Richter scale for 5.1; the earthquake was registered by a United States Geological Survey machine which started the suspicions that the seismic event wasn’t natural.

South Korea and other nearby nations are questioning the possibility of North Korea being able to detonate such weapon. Gathering the necessary scientific evidence to determine whether the test was successful or not may take several days.

North Korea continues to claim that their nuclear program is strictly for self-defense purposes only, claiming in a statement that “If there’s no invasion on our sovereignty, we will not use nuclear weapons.” North Korea also said “This H-bomb test brings us to a higher level of nuclear power.”

With this recent test, there is a growing concern amongst nations with North Korea’s foray into nuclear weapons. The South Korean Defense Ministry called an emergency meeting, Japanese officials held many discussions, and an emergency U.N. Security Council meeting took place on January 6.

A member of the White House’s National Security Council said “We have consistently made clear that we will not accept it as a nuclear state…We will continue to protect and defend our allies in the region, including the Republic of Korea, and will respond appropriately to any and all North Korean provocations.” The head of NATO Jens Stoltenberg condemns North Korea’s nuclear testing saying “The nuclear weapons test announced by North Korea undermines regional and international security, and is in clear breach of UN Security Council resolutions.”